Ambassadors to the Secular

September 13th, 2012 | | No Comments
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Abolishing the distinction between secular and sacred activities should revitalize our approach to evangelism especially. If we cling to the idea that some activities are “spiritual” while others are mundane, we will only proclaim the good news of Christ Jesus when we feel we are in the “spiritual” realm.  When we have our “church hat” on, we might participate in an outreach event; but when we have our “work hat” on, or our “home hat” on, we will consider it inappropriate to preach the gospel.

 

As we saw yesterday, however, “whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). There is no longer a divide between the sacred and the secular. That means we, as Christians, are always wearing our “all-for-the-glory-of-God hats.” When we are in the marketplace, we are there for the glory of God; when we are at the grocery store, we are there for the glory of God; when we are sitting on our back porch enjoying the last days of summer, we are there for the glory of God. This thought breathes new life into our approach to evangelism.

 

Wherever you are, whatever you are doing, you are always an ambassador of Christ. Once in Christ, you are a new creation, reconciled to Christ so that you can carry out the ministry of reconciliation, imploring others in Christ’s behalf: “Be reconciled to God” (2 Corinthians 5:17-21). We do not have the luxury of scheduling certain hours in our week for evangelism, while we go about our quiet, ineffectual business the rest of the time.

 

When at the park with your kids, surrounded by other families doing the same thing, strike up a conversation. Get to know the other moms and dads. Ask good questions, like Jesus did (cf. John 4:1-26)—after all, as one wag put it, “How will they hear unless we listen?” And then, when you discern the need, the hurt, the fear, the guilt, speak the good news.

 

When you are at work, you will see many who are worshiping the false gods of money, success, and power—idols who will leave them broken, bitter, and despairing. Love your colleagues unceasingly. And when the disappointment comes, offer the only healing balm. Look for opportunities—ask God for opportunities—to share what matters most with those you see almost every day.

 

We could multiply examples, but I trust you get the idea. Wherever you are, whatever you are doing, you are living for the glory of God. And that means proclaiming the gospel of peace, carrying out the ministry of reconciliation, making disciples of all nations under the authority and presence of Christ Jesus himself (Matthew 28:18-20)—every day, all day long. You get no breaks from being who you are.



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